2014 Forecast: Leggett the key in making Clemson TEs a weapon again

Clemson tight end Jordan Leggett, right, runs after catching a pass as linebacker Tony Steward defends during the Tigers' NCAA college football spring football game at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C. on Saturday, Apr. 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Anderson Independent-Mail, Mark Crammer)

Photo by Mark Crammer

Clemson tight end Jordan Leggett, right, runs after catching a pass as linebacker Tony Steward defends during the Tigers' NCAA college football spring football game at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C. on Saturday, Apr. 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Anderson Independent-Mail, Mark Crammer)

Tight end is perhaps one of the more intriguing positions to forecast in 2014. The three headed monster of Sam Cooper, Jordan Leggett and Stanton Seckinger offer a little bit of everything in three different body types as they are symmetrically listed on the depth chart as 6’6 250, 6’5 240 and 6’4 230 respectively…

My operating philosophy on the numbers below is that Cooper plays the role of the blocker, Leggett takes snaps from Seckinger as he develops consistency and grows into a veteran player and Seckinger plays an important, but reduced role.

It’s natural to assume that as a player moves through his career his statistics will improve each year. In reality, I believe Seckinger saw more time than expected last season because of Leggett’s injury and suspension.

While Seckinger is probably the “safer” option, an offense that loses an all-time great quarterback, explosive running back and two wide receivers is going to be looking for playmakers. Out of this group, that’s Jordan Leggett.

The question is has Leggett matured and embraced the role? - Marty Coleman

Marty Coleman - SeldomUsedReserve.com

Jordan Leggett

Breakout Season (12 games): 35 receptions, 525 yards, 6 TDs

Bust: 15 receptions, 175 yards, 1 TD

2014 Outlook: 19 receptions, 278 yards, 3 TDs

Stanton Seckinger

Breakout Season (12 games): 30 receptions, 400 yards, 6 TDs

Bust: 10 receptions, 112 yards, 1 TD

2014 Outlook: 14 receptions, 155 yards, 3 TDs

Sam Cooper

Breakout Season (12 games): 20 receptions, 168 yards, 3 TDs

Bust: 4 receptions, 40 yards, 0 TD

2014 Outlook: 7 receptions, 68 yards, 1 TD

For more analysis on the Clemson TEs and the rest in this series, check out SeldomUsedReserve.com.

Brandon Rink – OrangeandWhite.com

I’m bullish on the Tiger tight ends in 2014, but I have the roles pegged pretty much the same as Marty.

Leggett has shown glimpses of what he can do and has made a point to say his attitude has matured from points last season where he didn’t exactly take advantage of his early enrollee status.

In the spring game – yes, a spring game still – he paced Clemson’s receiving corps with seven catches for 59 yards and a touchdown working with heir-apparent quarterback Cole Stoudt. Stoudt will be looking for the big target down the field early and often and Leggett’s size and athleticism makes him every bit the nightmare matchup.

A proven contributor, Stanton Seckinger won’t go away either, which is why I have a career-high in catches for both this season.

Cooper may surprise and mold into a reliable target, but with Leggett and Seckinger better receiving TEs, it makes sense to have him in more run-oriented packages, therefore keeping his catches and yards low.

Overall, Clemson’s tight ends best the unit’s production in the 2011 season, where Dwayne Allen earned Mackey Award honors with 598 yards and eight scores

Jordan Leggett

Breakout Season (12 games): 40 catches – 650 yards – 6 TDs

Bust: 9 catches – 117 yards – 2 TDs

2014 Outlook: 27 catches – 380 yards – 5 TDs

Stanton Seckinger

Breakout Season (12 games): 40 catches – 600 yards – 7 TDs

Bust: 7 catches – 77 yards – 1 TD

2014 Outlook: 24 catches – 312 yards – 2 TDs

Sam Cooper

Breakout Season (12 games): 25 catches – 350 yards – 5 TDs

Bust: 5 catches – 55 yards

2014 Outlook: 10 catches – 90 yards – 1 TD

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Comments » 4

TigerFan95 writes:

Brandon,
One guy you left out is Jay Jay McCullough. The kid reminds me of a young Dwayne Allen. How do think he'll figure in the mix this year? I personally think he may end up being the best of the group by season's end.

BrandonRink writes:

in response to TigerFan95:

Brandon,
One guy you left out is Jay Jay McCullough. The kid reminds me of a young Dwayne Allen. How do think he'll figure in the mix this year? I personally think he may end up being the best of the group by season's end.

Left him out just because he wasn't on the depth chart... It's weird, they've experimented with him as a running back at some point last year and he actually reeled off some impressive runs in garbage time. I don't know if he's going to be more of an H-back like Darrell Smith was, but getting a look at some carries. He may be competing with Kurt Fleming that way.

He's just a hard evaluation because we really haven't seen him catching passes yet.

TigerNE writes:

A key factor for me is that Stoudt and Leggett are best buds - tight if you follow their social media posts. It seems like they work out and practice practically every day. So Leggett might get some preferred status from Stoudt's arm whenever possible.

No doubt they will be very familiar with each other on the field. May have the same thing that Boyd and Watkins had where Stoudt can read every non-verbal from Leggett.

seldomusedreserve#284867 writes:

I also found myself wondering about McCollough. I believe that display of running ability came late in a blow out against The Citadel, but still showed athleticism and versatility.

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