Inside Clemson football: Tajh Boyd's season through nine games

Clemson's Tajh Boyd runs from Maryland's Marcus Whitfield during the first quarter at Maryland.

Photo by Ken Ruinard

Clemson's Tajh Boyd runs from Maryland's Marcus Whitfield during the first quarter at Maryland.

Last year at this point, O&W contributor Marty Coleman's statistical breakdown demonstrated a Clemson offense efficient both vertically and side-to-side in the passing game.

That kind of efficiency is looking more atypical by the game though.

In 2012's 8-1 start, Clemson quarterback Tajh Boyd passed for 1,055 yards to his right (111 attempts) and 1,053 yards to his left (114 attempts), averaging his highest yards per pass attempt up the middle (9.9). He was averaging at least 9.24 yards per attempt to all fields.

In 2013's 8-1 start, he's thrown for 1,272 yards to the right (142 attempts) to 1,039 to the left (115 attempts). What's interesting is he's averaging the same yards per attempt (9) to both sides, and lower than '12 by a full yard up the middle (8.8).

Season to season, Boyd's needing over four more attempts per TD to the right (14.2) and over two to the left (16.4).

With the senior gunslinger's arm and a bevy of speedy receivers, the deep threat is still there.

Category '13 Clemson '12 Clemson '11 Clemson
Scoring Offense 39.8 PPG 42.7 PPG 32.5 PPG
Total Yards 507 YPG 522.4 YPG 482.5 YPG
Cmp. Pct. (Tajh Boyd) 65.8 67.8 61.9
Yards Per Pass (Tajh Boyd) 8.97 9.5 8.6
Passing Efficiency 159.6 170.2 154.8
Plays per game 84.7 80.5 78.3
Runs of 10+/Passes of 20+ 9.8 13.4 9.3
3rd Down Pct. 42.4 54.2 48.5
Yards Per Carry 3.9 4.4 4.3
Yards Per Play 6.0 6.5 6.2

On passes of 20-plus yards, Boyd is averaging 18.8 yards per attempt (45 completion percentage), with 10 touchdowns to a single pick. Last season his completion percentage (53) and yards per attempt (19.8) were higher, but he had only one more touchdown (11) and three more interceptions (4).

Against injury-ridden secondaries the last two games, he's posted a 74.3 completion percentage, averaging 339 yards and 9.7 yards per attempt. Taking out the one FCS date, however, Boyd has a respectable 66.2 completion rate on the season, averaging 306.4 yards per game and 9.1 per attempt.

Thanks to some blowouts, he has attempted just 26 fourth-quarter passes with two touchdowns. Despite some slow starts, his top efficiency is still in the first quarter (177.65), with seven TDs to one pick and one out of every four passes going for 15-plus yards.

In the red zone, the Hampton, Va. native has a 205.08 efficiency, completing 16-of-26 passes for eight touchdowns (no picks) and punching in seven more scores on the ground.

In conference ranks, he's No. 1 in total offense (2,814) and touchdowns (27); No. 2 in total offense per game (312.7; Leader: FSU's Jameis Winston, 331.9); No. 3 in pass efficiency (159.6; Leader: Winston, 201.1); No. 4 in yards per pass (9; Leader: Winston, 11.8); No. 9 in yards per play (7.2; Leader: GT's Robert Godhigh, 11.3) and rushing touchdowns (7).

Nationally, he's No. 10 in touchdown passes (20; Leader: Oregon State's Sean Mannion, 31); No. 12 in yards per pass (Leader: Baylor's Bryce Petty, 13.9); No. 15 in pass yards per game (291.1; Leader: Mannion, 393.3); No. 18 in total offense (Leader: Garrett Gilbert, 408.3**).

(CFBStats were used here in this post as well) **Gilbert was Chad Morris' QB at Lake Travis High School (Tx.).

© 2013 OrangeAndWhite.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Related Topics

Comments » 4

TigerNE writes:

The most significant numbers to me are those that show overall productivity is slightly down this year. Maybe it owes a lot to his targets as well as his arm and composure. Even though Sammy is hot this year, he still has had heavy coverage most of the time, leaving the some of the younger guys at Boyd's disposal. And it just seems like there are more drops and misses this year, overall. In other words, Nuk might account for a portion of the yard or so differences in averages. And add Ellington as a part of the change to the total offense numbers between the two seasons. HotRod is decent, but getting no where near Ellington's numbers per carry.

How he compares to others is more a matter of who they play and what those teams give them as far as openings.

rsb8931#286014 writes:

There is not enough difference in these numbers to make it worth your while to write about it. They are so close. You want a scoop on another player let me give you one. Sammy Watkins had better numbers in 2012 than he did in 2011. Look at the numbers and write about that. As you well know, perception plays a fairly big role in a lot of things that you sell to the public or what espn tries to mold into our psyche. Well, guess what? Sammy’s numbers were better in 2012 than in 2011 based on yards per catch and catches per game. I don’t know what else to go by. His touchdown productivity was down from 12 to 3 but everything else was slightly higher. Perception versus reality. It is an amazing phenomenon to say the least. Oh, you should check out Sammy’s numbers for this year against 2011 and 2012. It’ almost like he has another gear that he just started using this season. And there ain’t no perception about that. It is real as real can be. I will tell you this and if anyone checks it out they will find this to be true. Sammy’s numbers were almost identical in 2011 and 2012 based on a per game average. Of course he had more of the stuff in 2011 because he played in several more games.

seldomusedreserve#284867 writes:

'12 middle of field = Nuk. No proof, just my feeble memory and a guess.

I believe 4th and 16 was in the middle right? :)

BrandonRink writes:

in response to rsb8931#286014:

There is not enough difference in these numbers to make it worth your while to write about it. They are so close. You want a scoop on another player let me give you one. Sammy Watkins had better numbers in 2012 than he did in 2011. Look at the numbers and write about that. As you well know, perception plays a fairly big role in a lot of things that you sell to the public or what espn tries to mold into our psyche. Well, guess what? Sammy’s numbers were better in 2012 than in 2011 based on yards per catch and catches per game. I don’t know what else to go by. His touchdown productivity was down from 12 to 3 but everything else was slightly higher. Perception versus reality. It is an amazing phenomenon to say the least. Oh, you should check out Sammy’s numbers for this year against 2011 and 2012. It’ almost like he has another gear that he just started using this season. And there ain’t no perception about that. It is real as real can be. I will tell you this and if anyone checks it out they will find this to be true. Sammy’s numbers were almost identical in 2011 and 2012 based on a per game average. Of course he had more of the stuff in 2011 because he played in several more games.

I'd say that Sammy's numbers weren't as bad as some would say in 2012, but not quite identical in terms of production.

He averaged over 12 yards per catch in 10-of-14 games in 2011 and just 4-of-9 in 2012. He had three multi-touchdown games in 2011 and none in 2012. He just didn't have the explosive step to him that he had in '11, despite a higher reception per game average.

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Violators may be banned. Click here for our full user agreement.

Comments can be shared on Facebook and Yahoo!. Add both options by connecting your profiles.

Features